Witch Mercy Cosplay
Full costume tutorial

In this tutorial I will explain how I made every single part of my Witch Mercy costume.

To start out, the first thing to do is of course look at references. I made screenshots in-game in different lighting, so I could properly figure out the colours of the costume. I also looked at how the fabrics moved and if they had texture. With the lore of the Witch of the Wilds in mind, I decided on using luxurious fabrics with lots of texture and an expensive feeling to them. I wanted my Witch Mercy to look like she was in charge! (The Devil may wear Prada but Witch Mercy wears real velvet! 😉 ) I also made sure to make note of her proportions and shape, which I will elaborate upon later.

We will be working from top to bottom, so feel free to scroll to whichever part you are curious. Each part will have the materials listed. I’d also like to thank CosplayClues for sponsoring the foam, thermoplastic and various tools for this costume. I could not do what I do without them and I love using their materials.

Wig and Witch Hat
Materials used:
– Half long blonde lace front wig from WigisFashion
– Black cotton fabric
– Yellow cotton fabric
– Brown metallic stretch leather
– Fusible interfacing
– Tough interfacing for bags
– 2 mm foam
– Pearly Worbla
– Wood glue
– Acrylic paints and airbrush paints
– Got2B Hairspray

The wig was a natural blonde lace-front wig. The advantage to a lace-front wig, is that the hairline looks nice and natural. The wig I got had a bit of a widow’s peak in the middle, which Mercy doesn’t have, so I carefully loosened the unwanted hair fibers with a seam ripper. After that, I trimmed the lace very close to the hairline, so you could barely see it. Some people advice to leave about 1 cm of lace, but I don’t like the way that looks, so I always trim it all off. After that I cut the wig shorter, especially in the back, and gently curled it. I decided on going for a more natural look to her hair, because I wanted to make a translation from videogame to real life. So I tried to give her bangs volume and bounce, but not make them too blocky. I simply set them with some hairspray.
The hat was first patterned. When measuring my head circumference for the hat, I made sure to add a couple of cm of ease, because I would be wearing a wigcap and wig later on, and that adds quite a lot of volume! If you don’t account for this, your hat will not fit over your wig and you’ll get floating hat syndrome. The hat was made up of two halves for the tail end and a double layered brim. The brim was first cut out and doubled up at the outer seam, then interfacing was added. I added the fusible interfacing to the bottom edge and the bag interfacing to the top edge. This way the brim was sturdy and lightweight and able to flare by itself. I attached the brim to the tail and finished the seam with the lower layer of the brim. In the end, I added a rod of Worbla into the tail, so it would stand up a little higher. I simply hand-sewed that in. After that I added 3 hairclips to keep it secure on my wig, so I would not have to worry about it falling off during a performance.
For the belt and buckle, I made a long strip of 2mm foam and doubled it up with the stretch leather. I cut bias strips from my yellow cotton and airbrushed them to have a gradient. After that I hemmed the belt with the bias strips. The buckle was made of one layer of 2mm foam sandwiched in Pearly Worbla, then primed with wood glue, and airbrushed. The belt was attached with a little hand stitch onto the hat. Tada!

Jacket and Scarf
Materials:
– Black stretch cotton fabric
– Yellow cotton fabric
– Red velvet fabric
– Fusible interfacing
– Airbrush paints
– Bra closure
– Hooks and rings

The jacket started out as a bolero pattern that I modified to have a collar and to have short sleeves. I chose a stretch cotton for the jacket because it would be more comfortable and it would allow for more ease of movement. After testing out the pattern, I took the pattern pieces apart and drafted out the details on the sleeves. I wanted the sleeves to be lined, so I made plans to make part of the lining yellow to match the upper sleeve design. The yellow fabrics were cut out and then first airbrushed to have a subtle gradient. Then the complex pattern pieces were put together and the sleeves were lined. The collar was stiffened with fusible interfacing before attaching to the jacket. I used the yellow cotton again to make bias strips, which I airbrushed before hemming the collar. The jacket closes with a bra closure on my collarbone. The advantage to using these closures is that they’re very reliable, they’re cheap and they can close clothing seamlessly.
The scarf was lined and was basically a big triangle. I draped it around my shoulders, slightly adjusted the shape to be elongated in the back, and closed it in the front with a hand stitch. I can put it on over my head and keep it in place with two hooks on the jacket.

Corset
Materials:
– Brown faux suede fabric
– Black cotton fabric
– Black coutil fabric
– Fusible interfacing
– Twill boning tape and twill waist tape
– Spiral steel boning
– Flat steel boning
– Plastic boning scraps
– Preformed bra cups with underwires
– 5mm grommets

Oh boy here we go! The corset was technically one of the most difficult parts of this costume. As I mentioned before, when I looked at the references, I really noticed Mercy’s exaggerated shape in this costume. (This skin is popular for a reason, I guess!) Her waist is tiny, her breasts are emphasized and her hips are very round and curvy. As I am unfortunately just a normal human being, I needed to build in some magic to mimic her proportions!
In comes the corset. The aim of this corset was to make my waist appear smaller, help push up and pad my bust, and smooth out my hips. I tried adapting some Victorian corset patterns, but nothing got me the shape I really wanted. So I ended up starting from scratch with the measurements I wanted to achieve as a guide. I drafted a custom twelve panel corset pattern that would cinch my waist 15 cm smaller, help expand my bust from a B cup to a generous E, and fit snugly around the hips. After making a mock-up and adding some slight adjustments, I took the pattern pieces and divided them again by the colour they were supposed to be (brown or black). I ended up with 26 panels for the entire thing! Make sure to mark all your pattern pieces properly, because with so many pieces, you’re bound to get confused. (I know I am, at least.)
The first step was to cut out all the pieces from the brown suede and the black cotton and to join the pieces together so I would have 12 corset panels again. I made sure to mark exactly where the pieces had to be joined, to make sure that the horizontal lines in the final corset would not be distorted. There were some very sharp corners that needed to be sewn by hand. We’ll call this layer the outer layer. Then I cut out all 12 pieces out of corset coutil and also of out black cotton. These will be the strength layer and the lining layer. I chose corset coutil because it is very strong and durable, and there would be a lot of force on the corset. Coutil will be your best choice if you’re going to be tightlacing, but it can be a bit pricey.
I added the boning channels to the inside of the strength layer (so that means on the side of the lining). Then I fused the coutil to the outer layer for sturdiness and to make sure the delicate fabrics would not get damaged from any pressure or forces. I ended up stitching through the outside to extra fuse the coutil to the outer layer, where I use a lot of pins to keep the panels exactly aligned. The aesthetic of the subtle boning channels added some extra depth and dimension to the corset. By adding the boning on the inside of the strength layer, the corset will look smooth and not like it has steel inside at all. I don’t join my two corset halves together until the very last, because it’s easier to handle half a corset under a sewing machine and the centre front is a straight seam, which is easy to do last. The corset was boned with flat steel on the centre front and centre back, and the rest of the seams with spiral steel to account for the extreme curves. The bra cups were tacked in by hand and then filled up with some padding.
After that, the lining was added and tacked inside, as it will be a floating lining. I made bias strips from my black cotton and hemmed the top and bottom of the corset, sewing the inside by hand so no stitches would be visible. I chose black 5mm grommets and placed them in the back. I didn’t want any skin showing through, so I made a modesty panel from the black cotton and placed it on the left side of the corset. Three horizontal plastic boning scraps keep the modesty panel flush against my back and make it easier to lace the corset up. For lacing I ended up using a black satin ribbon – not ideal, but it looks pretty. I would definitely recommend getting some proper lacing cord to make your life easier. If you’re going with satin ribbon, seal the edges with a small flame (like from a lighter or a match) to prevent fraying.

Skirt
Materials:
– Tan linen
– Yellow cotton
– Zipper
– Fabric glue
– Coffee
– Airbrush paints

The skirt, in comparison, was fairly simple! I bought a tan coloured linen with a nice rough texture. It was a little light, so I left it overnight in some really dark coffee. This made it a few shades darker and not quite as clean looking, which was closer to the reference. I decided to make the skirt double-sided, so the skirt is fully lined and also has the yellow decoration on the inside. I cut out the panels from the yellow cotton and ironed in the hemline. Then I added the gradient with the airbrush, and after drying I carefully sewed them onto the linen. Then the two matching halves were joined together. I carefully cut the fabric at the bottom to mimic the torn look of the skirt in the reference. On all the cutting lines I glued the front to the lining to prevent fraying and to keep the skirts from shifting.
For the weathering, I burnt up a small piece of fabric as an example what fire damage would realistically look like on this fabric. I replicated that as best I could with my airbrush while still trying to stay true to the reference. ( I don’t know what could cause burn damage to a skirt – Dragon Symmetra’s firey fingers perhaps? 😉 ) The front skirt and back skirt were joined in the sides and a simple zipper in the back made them easy to wear. Next!

Gloves and bracelet
Materials:
– Faux stretch suede
– Iron-on flock foil
– Foam dowels
– Hexflex clear
– Golden acrylics
– Velcro
– Square silver studs
– Buttons
– Airbrush paints

The glove pattern was adapted from a pretty standard glove pattern with a separate thumb. The fabric I chose was absolutely impossible to sew with a sewing machine, so I ended up hand sewing the entire gloves. I started by sewing the fingers together, then adding the thumb after making sure they fit properly. The torn fringe was added into the back seam on the arm.
In photoshop, I carefully replicated the logo on Mercy’s hands. I uploaded the file to my vinyl cutter and cut the emblem out of dark brown flock foil. This is an iron-on material which feels nice and soft, and it blended perfectly with the suede. I added these to the backs of the hands.
The bracelets are on my dominant hand, so I already knew they’d be bumping into things and people and they needed to remain in shape, no cracks, and I wanted them to be light. So I made them from foam dowels. These are super handy for clean, round shapes! I cut them to length and glued the ends together. With my heatgun, I heated them up to seal the foam and make the shape perfectly round. Heflex is a painting medium that stays flexible after drying, which is perfect for foam pieces that are going to be abused a lot. I mixed my gold acrylics with hexflex and gave the dowels a good few coats. I glued in a tiny piece of Velcro on the bracelet, and sewed the corresponding piece to the wrist of my glove. The bracelets were now detachable and would stay in place no matter what. They weigh about 20 grams, so they never bothered me nor sagged the gloves.
As a final touch I added some buttons to the inside of the jacket, where the gloves could be attached. This way, they could not sag down. The silver studs were added all along the seams of the gloves.

Jewelry
Materials:
– 3D modeling software
– ABS 3D printing filament
– Sanding paper, ranging from 400 to 1500 grit
– Mold making silicone (ClueyMold)
– Polyurethane resin (ClueyCast)
– Acrylic paints and airbrush paints

The jewelry was a really fun part of the costume. I 3D modeled all the jewelry parts of the costume, so those were: the emblems on the corset, on the book, on the legs, the earrings, the triangle runes, and the brooch. When modeling, I was already thinking about how I was going to attach them to the costume. For the emblems and triangle runes I made sure to make some holes in the design, so I could sew them onto the fabric. The earrings got holes too of course to attach the clip-ons. (I wanted to add proper earring hooks, but my ear piercings all closed up when the Widowmaker skin issues happened and everything got inflamed… and I haven’t had the heart to get them re-pierced yet. So clip-ons would have to do!)
After printing, the sanding began! I carefully sanded each 3D print, building up from 400 to 1500 grit. After the prints were silky smooth, I made molds with high-detail silicone. This allowed me to get many copies of the 3D prints. The copies were cast in PU resin, which hardens in about 7 minutes, so I could make many copies in a relatively short time. (I made some of the holes too small, so I had to put in some cocktail sticks during casting to make sure my needle would fit through.) The brooch was cast with rings on the back to allow me to sew it on.
After making many many many copies of the emblems and choosing the best ones, I trimmed and cleaned them, and painted them. Then the emblems were sewn on.

Book of Life
Materials:
– Sintra foamboard
– Metallic brown stretch leather
– 2 mm foam
– Watercolour paper
– Coffee
– Flock foil
– Black felt
– Bag magnet
– Acrylic paints

When reading the lore, I absolutely loved the detail of the book that was added to the skin. In this book, Mercy keeps all of her contracts – souls bound to her by the wishes she fulfilled. I really wanted this book to be a functional item, so people could write in it, and have a way of making the magic theatre of cosplay happen. The book has a whole collection of spells, messages, and memories in it by now, so it’s more than just a cosplay prop to me.
The book started as three panels of sturdy sintra. Two would be the front and back cover, and one long strip of the spine. I heated up the spine to give it a gentle curve. Then the sintra was wrapped in brown stretch leather. The details were made of 2mm foam and carefully painted. The watercolour paper was sprayed with coffee to make them puffy and look old.
I didn’t want the book to be too heavy, so I made a part of the pages fake. I built a box of sintra and glued the outer edge of the papers to it. In the middle, I bound together a folder of paper and glued that onto the fake pages. Now the book could only open on the real pages, but would look much fuller. The lettering and details were designed digitally, and uploaded to my vinyl cutter. I cut them out of flock foil and carefully glued them on.
The strap that closes the book was made the same way, sintra covered with stretch fabric, and detailed with foam. I added a bag magnet so the book could close easily. A ring on the back attached the book to my corset, so I could easily carry it around.

Purse
Materials:
– Brown faux suede fabric
– Red velvet fabric
– Purse clasp
– Flock foil
– Golden and silver metallic embroidery thread

Since Mercy does not really have room for any pockets, I wanted to at least make the purse functional. I had never worked with a purse clasp before, but it is very fun and they add a very professional look to the bag.
I started with drawing out the pattern, keeping in mind the shape of the purse, the size of the clasp and the reference. Then I cut the pattern out of my brown suede and the red velvet for the lining. I replicated the design on the purse digitally and cut it out of flock foil with my vinyl cutter. This flock foil design acted as a guide for the embroidery, which was done by hand. I needed to make several perfect circles, so these flock foil designs kept me on track. The embroidery thread was split as thin as it would go, and then carefully layered to make a smooth, shimmery surface.
After that, I joined the outer layer and the lining layer together. The purse clasp was sewn in by hand with matching silver embroidery thread. Two loops on the back of the purse let me wear the purse on the belt.

Wings
Materials:
– PVC pipe
– Regular Worbla
– 2mm foam
– 5mm foam
– LEDfoam
– Worbla Transpa Art
– 5 meters of LEDstrips
– Switch
– Connectors and wire
– Battery pack
– Screws and wingnuts
– Herringbone tape
– Contact cement
– Airbrush paints

The wings are definitely the part I got the most questions about. My wings have a wingspan of almost 2 meter, but only weigh about 500 grams each.
I started out with making a design for the wings. I planned out the inner structure of the wings, and where the wiring would go. A single PVC pipe carries the entire weight of one wing. I bent the PVC pipe into shape, then melted some Worbla around it. I made a small panel with holes in it on the PVC pipe. The holes corresponded with holes on the harness. Simply by applying some screws with wingnuts I could easily attach and detach the wings from the harness. For transport this would prove insanely helpful!
Then the framework was built from 5mm foam. This foam is sturdier than 2mm and holds its shape better, but is not as rigid as 10mm foam. I added details with 2mm foam. I fitted the foam framework over the PVC pipe, and glued it down. Then I made patterns for the actual wings.
I wanted the wings to be translucent enough to let through light, but also have very bright colour when there was no light. Acrylic would seem the best option, but it’s heavy and fragile. Worbla’s Transpa Art can be smoothened with heat, so that’s what I did. I heated up an entire plate of Transpa Art to make it perfectly smooth, and then cut my wing patterns from it. The wings and foam were airbrushed to have the proper colour and gradient. I glued the wings into the foam structure, to the front. The LEDs would be attached behind it.
I decided on glueing in the LEDstrips before soldering them. Make sure that the soldering points are accessible and not covered by a rubber coating. The LEDstrips were soldered in parallel sets of no more than 1 meter in maximum length and attached to a block of 8x AAA batteries. The connectors allowed me to take the circuit apart when the wings were detached from the harness.
The LEDstrips were then covered with some LEDfoam to diffuse it. I sewed some herringbone tape to the harness, so I could slip it over my shoulders.

Shoes
Materials:
– Base shoes
– Paper tape
– Clear cling wrap
– Brown stretch fabric
– Yellow cotton
– 2mm foam
– Pearly Worbla
– Airbrush paints
– Contact cement

The shoes were fairly comfortable, even though they certainly don’t look it! I built the shoes on top of base shoes that fit me well, so I could walk pretty well in them.
First step was to trim the shoes down to the proper height. Then I covered them in cling wrap and then in paper tape, to allow me to make a pattern directly from the shoe. I already experimented with the nose shape here, to see how high it could be without hindering me. Then I cut the paper tape loose and transferred the pattern to sturdy paper. The nose was built from 2mm foam and the fabric glued on top of it, so that it would stay taut. The yellow and grey designs were made from fabrics I’d already used in the costume, to make the whole seem more connected. I airbrushed them to look more weathered and have more depth. The shoe was basically three main parts; the back of the shoe, the straps, and the nose. I attached all three parts separately, glueing them down to the shoe.
The buckles, noses and details were made from 2mm foam sandwiched with Pearly Worbla. I painted them before attaching them to the shoes. The buckles were sewn down next to being glued. I glued the Worbla noses onto the shoes before attaching the foam/fabric sandwich. The final step was to give the shoes a once-over with my airbrush to blend everything in and they were done!

Broom
Materials:
– PVC pipe (grey)
– Pearly Worbla
– Regular Worbla
– 2mm foam
– 5mm foam
– Expanding foam
– cardboard
– Small lens
– LEDs (2x blue, 2x yellow)
– Switch
– Battery pack

My pride and joy is my broom! This prop features two different LED-circuits, which make the colours of the light switchable between blue and yellow. It also doubles as a walking stick.
Planning is key when integrating LEDs into your costume. I first made a full blueprint of the circuit that I would use and where the battery, switch and LEDs would be placed. Then I bent the PVC pipe into shape, giving it a small bend at the end where it would support the brush-end.
I drilled some holes and first attached the LEDs into place. Meanwhile, I made the different parts of the top from 2mm foam sandwiched with Pearly Worbla. I made the attachments out of regular Worbla, because it is stronger than Pearly. Here we made some details that I really love: the box on the broom that shows whether the damage boost or heal boost is engaged, and the emblem, which was placed under a lens to make it visible from any angle. The Worbla pieces were carefully heat shaped and then melted onto the PVC pipe. A cap was made of Worbla and attached with a magnet over the battery pack, so I can remove it any time I need to change the battery. Then all the lenses and were taped off so paint would not get on them.
The brush end of the broom was patterned out with some cardboard, glued onto the PVC pipe. By cutting the cardboard, I could see how big the brush end would end up. Then I added some layers of expanding foam onto the brush end. After hardening, the cardboard had completely disappeared from view. I trimmed back the expanding foam until I could tell the outline of the cardboard again, and then trimmed and sculpted the expanding foam into shape. This made for a lightweight core. With strips of 5mm foam layered over the expanding foam core, I built the cartoony shape of the brush end. With a wood burning tool, I went in and burned more texture into the foam. After that I heat-sealed the foam and then gave it a quick brush over with acrylics. Afterwards, I went back and softened the gradient with the airbrush.
The top end was also carefully painted and airbrushed, making sure to keep the lenses for the LEDs clean. The middle was painted by hand with acrylics, replicating a wood-like structure.

That’s all of it! If you have any questions after all these explanations, feel free to send us a message on any of our social media. Also if this was helpful to you, a like or comment on instagram or facebook would be super appreciated! 😀 Stay tuned for more tutorials and write-ups, and also live crafting streams!
Thank you for reading!
Xxx
Team Paraluna

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